Production

Propolis

Price: 100 g. - 15 GEL

Propolis is a resinous mixture that honey bees collect from tree buds, sap flows, or other botanical sources. It is used as a sealant for unwanted open spaces in the hive. The composition of propolis varies from hive to hive, from district to district, and from season to season.[4] Normally it is dark brown in color, but it can be found in green, red, black, and white hues, depending on the sources of resin found in the particular hive area. Honey bees are opportunists, gathering what they need from available sources, and detailed analyses show that the chemical composition of propolis varies considerably from region to region, along with the vegetation. Preliminary scientific studies show some types of propolis have in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity (with active constituents including flavonoids like galangin and hydroxycinnamic acids like caffeic acid).



In one recent analysis of propolis from England, 150 compounds were identified in only one sample (Greenaway, et al., 1990), but in total more than 180 have been isolated so far. It appears that with every new analysis, new compounds are found. Dermatological and cosmetic applications are at this time probably the most common uses for propolis and its extracts (Lejeune, et al., 1988). Its effects on tissue regeneration and renovation have been well studied. Together with its bactericidal and fungicidal characteristics it provides many benefits in various applications in cosmetics. General medicinal uses of propolis include treatment of the cardiovascular and blood systems (anaemia), respiratory apparatus (for various infections), dental care, dermatology (tissue regeneration, ulcers, excema, wound healing - particularly burn wounds, mycosis, mucous membrane infections and lesions), cancer treatment, immune system support and improvement, digestive tracts (ulcers and infections), liver protection and support and many others.